Category Archives: Uncategorized

MIKHAIL KIDD AWARDED DR. HENRY W. INDYK SCHOLARSHIP

Mikhail Kidd has been awarded the one-year Dr. Henry W. Indyk Scholarship, which is administered by The Lawn Institute (TLI). He is the son of James and Katy Kidd. James Kidd is a partowner of Cloverdale Nursery in Boise, Idaho. Mikhail is a student at Utah State University, Logan, Utah, where he is at the mid-point in his five-year field of study in Residential Landscape Design and Construction. Mikhail, and his wife, Sydney, were married in August of 2019. She is studying journalism at Utah State University.

In the career goals essay in his scholarship application, Mikhail wrote, “A career in turfgrass management has always been my goal ever since I started working as a freshman in high school. I started working at Cloverdale Nursery & Turf Farm, which is the biggest supplier of sod based out of Idaho. I worked as a general laborer at their nursery. I was drawn to the portion of the business that grew and distributed sod, and the next summer I started my own business (K2 Landscape) which focused on commercial and residential sod installation. I worked as a subcontractor for Cloverdale Nursery, and enjoyed laying sod every summer until I graduated.”

During those high school years, Mikhail was a four-time state champion in track, serving as team captain for two years, and was an all-state cornerback his senior year. He was also class president for two years, student body vice president his junior year, and student body president his senior year.

After high school graduation, Mikhail served two years as a missionary in the country of Paraguay. He said, “It was a great service opportunity, teaching about God and Jesus and seeing people find hope in their lives. I also learned Spanish among many other valuable lessons and perspectives.”

When he returned home in 2017, Mikhail resumed working at Cloverdale Nursery but this time at their turf farm. He wrote, “I started learning the various trades of a turf farm, and really enjoyed my work. I learned how to operate the sod harvesters we used, the process of irrigating the sod, loading the sod onto semi-trucks, and mowing the sod with industrial-sized mowers. Every summer I have returned to the sod farm and have continued learning and gaining experience. I hope to one day achieve a management position at a sod farm, so I can continue doing this work that I have grown to enjoy.” He has been able to use the Spanish he learned as a missionary to better communicate with those employees for whom Spanish is their first language.

In her letter of recommendation, Cristin Cook, procurement manager for Cloverdale Nursery, wrote, “I have known of Mikhail Kidd his entire life. He is a very good man with great values.” And, “Although I didn’t work directly with him, I heard of his excellent work ethic from numerous employees that he worked with.”

Mikhail noted that many of his achievements are tied to lessons he learned working in the turfgrass industry. He wrote, “Though I have seen athletic success in my life, it has been far from easy. In high school I experienced two different season ending injuries that I had to overcome and push through. During my first year of college, I tried walking-on to the track team and ended up getting cut. I kept training on my own, and the next year, my run times secured my spot on the roster.”

He added, “My work in the turfgrass industry helped me overcome these challenges and achieve success through struggle. The work isn’t always easy, especially stacking sod for hours during hot summer months, or moving sprinkler pipe with soaked boots. Doing this work taught me that enduring hard things for a short time can help you achieve great things in the long run.”

Mikhail said, “Working with turfgrass has also taught me to take pride in doing high quality work, whether as a missionary, a student, an athlete, or in my job. These lessons will continue to help me in future aspects of my life.” Strike while.

Article originally published May/June 2020 Turf News

MIKHAIL KIDD AWARDED DR. HENRY W. INDYK SCHOLARSHIP

Nathan Heuver Awarded Dr. Henry W. Indyk Scholarship

Nathan Heuver has been awarded the four-year Dr. Henry W. Indyk Scholarship, which is administered by The Lawn Institute (TLI). He is the son of Eric Heuver, Eagle Lake Professional Landscape Supply, Strathmore, Alberta, Canada. A student at the University of Victoria in Victoria, British Columbia, Nathan will be starting his senior year in the fall of 2021 to complete his undergraduate studies in Biology. He intends to further his education by pursuing a graduate degree.

In the career goals essay in his scholarship application, Nathan wrote, “Throughout my time in university, the biological topic of ecology has interested me greatly and I plan to further my education in this field. By furthering our understanding of the ecological processes surrounding us, we are able to better control our environment with a variety of practical applications.”

He witnessed practical applications of biology in 2019, as a summer co-op student for Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada in their ecological entomology lab in Saskatoon. He wrote, “… I was able to see the research that is currently being done to help manage, control and predict insect pest species of agriculture crops.”

Nathan added, “I have also been exposed to a research environment through independent research courses in the Department of Chemistry in Katherine Elvira’s lab and through work-study employment in Julia Baum’s lab in the Department of Biology at the University of Victoria. These opportunities have encouraged independent thought and problem-solving skills, and rewards that I have achieved have encouraged me to pursue science as a career.”

In her letter of recommendation for this scholarship, Dr. Elvira wrote, “Nathan is one of those rare students who is able to learn quickly and adapt to a new environment.” And, “It is highly unusual for a student to be able to perform an independent research project with so little input from me. His work was high quality and very helpful to the group’s research in general.”

Dr. Elvira also interacted with Nathan through his elected role as an undergraduate representative on the university’s Chemistry Equity, Diversity and Inclusions (Chem EDI) committee. Dr. Elvira wrote, “Nathan’s work on the committee is stellar. He is engaged, quick to volunteer to take on tasks, great at communicating in a timely manner, insightful, and obviously committed to the Chem EDI goals …” She called his conduct in both the group and the committee, “… professional, mature and kind.”

Nathan also served two years as a Student Ambassador and Health Educator for the University of Victoria Health Services where he organized healthy living projects for the student community. In addition, for two years, he volunteered as an assistant coach for the fundamentals program of Special Olympics Victoria, teaching sports to 7-to-11-year-old children with disabilities.

In his essay in response to the question, “How has the turfgrass industry shaped your personal character?” Nathan wrote, “For every summer since I was 14 years old up till the summer after my first year at university, I worked to some degree on my family’s farm, Eagle Lake Turf Farms. Though the work was hard, it has had an intangible effect on how I view the world, challenges I face, and my attitude towards demanding work.”

He added, “One of the main takeaways from working on the farm has been my experience working with the ten seasonal workers that our farm employs from Mexico.” Nathan reported that experience allowed him to develop friendships across linguistic and cultural boundaries. It also encouraged him to welcome the intercultural connections of the university environment.

Nathan is adventurous, always seeking experiences that will broaden his outlook and his skills. He loves the outdoors and thrives on exploring new sites for skiing, kayaking, hiking and camping. Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, he had planned to spend the summer of 2020 in an international co-op job through the DAAD RISE Germany program in ecology, seeking to widen his world view. Currently, those plans are on hold. Instead, he will work at the turf farm where he hopes to “apply the experience I have gained and take on more responsibility.”

Article originally published May/June 2020 Turf News

NATHAN HEUVER - 2020 TLI Scholarship Winner

TLI Scholarship Winner 2020

Sod Checkoff Initiative Webinar #1 Recap

rolled sodMembers of the U.S sod production industry have asked Turfgrass Producers International (TPI) to investigate the potential interest among sod producers in a sod checkoff program as well as its impacts. Over the next 12-18 months, TPI will host online webinars to seek input from producers and to share information on what a potential checkoff could look like for the sod industry. Any sod industry checkoff would be designed, implemented and governed by sod producers, for sod producers. All U.S. sod producers will have a chance to provide input on establishing an industry-wide checkoff and ultimately be asked to vote on it in a nationwide referendum in order for it to become law.

 

Over 110 attendees registered for the first webinar on May 19, 2020, with the following agenda:

  • Sod Checkoff Introduction

Hank Kerfoot, President of Modern Turf

  • USDA Research and Promotions Program History and Overview

Dr. Casey Reynolds, TPI

  • Sod Industry Checkoff, Building the Case

Dr. Casey Reynolds, TPI

  • Dairy Industry Checkoff, Background, and Successes.

Marilyn Hershey, AR-JOY Farms LLC

  • Sod Checkoff Development, Process, Referendum, and Compliance.

Wayne Watkinson, Watkinson-Miller LLC

 

Dr. Casey Reynolds and Wayne Watkinson did a wonderful job explaining what a USDA Research and Promotion Program (also known as a checkoff) is and could look like for the sod production industry. We heard first-hand experience from Marilyn Hershey on the success of the Dairy Industry Checkoff. Marilyn is a Pennsylvania dairy farmer and the chairperson of Dairy Management Incorporated (DMI), which is a key dairy industry checkoff program. The webinar ended with several insightful questions from our participants. If you missed it, you can watch the entire un-edited webinar here and ask questions on SodCheckoff.org.

Sod checkoff Webinar #1 

Key Takeaways from Sod Checkoff Webinar #1

 

Background

  • USDA Research and Promotion programs commonly referred to as “checkoffs” began in 1966 when Congress authorized them at the federal level. The term checkoff originated from producers having to check a box if they were interested in participating. Today, all USDA programs are mandatory, but the term remains.
  • Research and Promotion programs establish a legal framework for producers to pool resources and promote the industry as a whole. These programs help to:
    • Strengthen Existing Markets
    • Develop New Markets
    • Conduct Important Market and Scientific Research
    • Drive Demand for the Covered Commodity
    • Engage other industries to leverage promotional funds
  • Checkoffs are Industry programs, NOT federal government or USDA programs. They are created and governed by industry members (producers, farmers, etc.)
  • There has not been a checkoff program established yet for turfgrass sod producers. Everything to this point has been exploratory and this webinar was the first of its kind seeking industry input.

 

Why the Turfgrass Industry Could Benefit from a Checkoff

  • Lack of public understanding of our product and its value
  • Generational opinions on the value of lawns are changing
  • Regulatory threats to our market
  • Competitive threats to our market
  • We have a good story that needs to be told

 

What is a Checkoff Program?

  • Congress authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to implement programs for agricultural products
  • Checkoffs use federal authority to ensure fairness and compliance.
  • Checkoffs are Industry Programs with an active “Board of Producers.” The Board has the following responsibilities:
    • Sets the budget
    • Creates the programs
    • Oversees the programs
  • If approved, compliance is mandatory

 

Process for Developing a Checkoff

  • The industry drafts rules for a Checkoff program
  • The industry works with the U.S. Dept of Agriculture (USDA) to finalize the proposal
  • The final proposal is published for public comment
  • A referendum is held within the industry to approve the program

 

Next Steps for Creating a Program

  • The industry appoints a program development committee that drafts the rules of the program.
  • The Development Committee will be comprised of large and small producers, a wide geographic representation of producers, TPI, and non-TPI members, etc.
  • The industry then shares the draft program with the USDA and works with them to develop a final rule and publish a referendum for voting.

 

While TPI is leading the beginning stages of this effort, this will be an industry program, not a TPI program. We are here to help facilitate conversations between producers and the USDA. If you have any questions or would like to be included in the next steps, please email us at Info@TurfgrassSod.org

JUST LAUNCHED- TPI TV!

Being a member of TPI comes with more than just a subscription of Turf News and discounts to our famous conferences. We have a wealth of member-only additional perks just for Turfgrass Producers and Suppliers. We’re thrilled to announce our last membership benefit – TPI TV.

TPI TV allows us the ability to bring you industry education from our conferences to your home. We have collected our most popular sessions and placed them in one easy location to access. You’ll find sessions from both 2019 and 2020 TPI Conference and Field Day, as well as, our conference recap videos. All you have to do is log in!

How to login:

1- Head to TurfgrassSod.org.

2- Find TPI TV on the menu.

3- Scroll to the login button.

4- Select login and use your TPI membership username and password.

    1. If you do not know your login information, give us a call at 800-405-8873.
    2. Do not reset your password in this portal if you have forgotten it, allow us to change this for you.

5- Enjoy a video of your choice!

Turfgrass Industry Updates at Green Industry Shows

TPI Conference 2020

TPI’s Executive Director Dr. Casey Reynolds shares turfgrass updates at industry events

At TPI, our mission is to be the voice of the turfgrass industry. Casey Reynolds, executive director of TPI, spoke at two events in Greensboro, North Carolina on January 29 – the 2020 NC Sod Producers Association Winter Conference and Green & Growin’ Education event.

The events gathered sod producers, landscapers and retailers from around the state to discuss industry best practices, opportunities and challenges, including pest management and disaster preparedness.

In TPI’s sessions, Casey shared important government regulation changes that impact attendees’ businesses – such as rules on hours of service and electronic logging devices (ELD) in the agriculture industry.

“TPI is proud to represent the voice of sod producers everywhere in regulation meetings so their ideas and concerns are heard by decision makers,” says Casey. “We then make sure to share updates and resources with our members, so sod producers have the information they need to thrive.”

Casey also discussed TPI’s action in shaping and responding to regulatory changes. For example, TPI met with officials of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration in November 2018 to discuss exemptions for agricultural commodities in certain policies. The proposed FRESH Trucking Act of 2020 and the Agricultural Commodity Trucking Relief Act of 2019 would protect horticultural and floricultural commodities, including sod that is sensitive to temperature and climate and at risk of perishing in transit. TPI also engages with the Environmental Protection Agency and the Office of Pesticide Programs as well as the USDA agricultural census to advocate for the goals of sod producers.

In addition to legislative priorities, TPI shared environmental and population trends that affect the future of natural grass lawns and landscapes. Casey discussed U.S. population movements and weather pattern changes in precipitation and temperature. These trends suggest an expected increased demand for water – and turfgrass – in urban environments.

Throughout the year, TPI proactively pursues these opportunity through partnerships (like with GreenScapes Alliance) and presence at local, state and federal regulatory affairs meetings. Internally, TPI conducts market research to understand how people feel and think about natural grass, and then launches public relations campaigns to increase education and awareness by dispelling myths and delivering accurate, comprehensive and compelling information to key stakeholders.

To learn more about TPI’s legislative and advocacy work, check out our Industry Harvest articles tagged “Government Affairs.”