TPI Requests Farmer Comments on Impending Changes to Oxadiazon in Sod Farms

EPA Proposes changes to Oxadiazon label in Sod Farms and other sites

The EPA has posted a Proposed Interim Decision for oxadiazon and TPI is working on behalf of sod farms to provide much needed feedback on the impacts to our industry. With significant changes to the oxadiazon label proposed, EPA needs to hear your expert opinions on the proposed mitigations in order to maintain the utility of this tool for weed control in sod farms. We would greatly appreciate your feedback to our questions below and your willingness to submit comments to EPA by November 3rd. The industry is currently seeking an extension but have yet to confirm whether or not it will be granted.

Summary of EPA Identified Issues with Oxadiazon and Proposed Mitigations 

Proposed pattern and rate reductions for all liquid and granular formulations

  • Use on turfgrass will be limited to golf course fairways and sod farms only
  • Yearly maximum use rate to be reduced from 8 lb ail/A to 6 lb ai/A
  • The single maximum application rate reduced from 4 lb ai/A to 3 lb ai/A
  • Applications are limited to 2 per year – spring and fall
  • Liquid applications will be limited to 1 per year
  • There must be a 120-day retreatment interval between applications
  • Applications to sports fields is prohibited, included at planting/new construction

Key Impacts on Sod Farmers

“Flexibility in use and timing is one of the key items we need to address with EPA”, says Dr. Casey Reynolds of TPI. Sod farms don’t always follow the typical timing of golf courses, athletic fields, and other sites. Many of those sites will apply oxadiazon at the same time each spring to prevent summer annual weeds, but in sod farms it is often applied after harvest and at new plantings throughout the year. Another item that needs to be addressed is new construction and sprigging of athletic fields. If sod farmers who also install natural grass sprigs or sod on newly constructed athletic fields lose oxadiazon in these scenarios, then it will almost certainly have a significant impact on those projects.

“We have not lost sight of the fact that we will retain oxadiazon as a key tool for weed control in sod production and need to share that with the EPA as well”, says Dr. Reynolds. “We have been working with other key industry partners and the EPA on this important topic and will continue to work on this on behalf of all sod farmers.”

Instructions for Providing Comments to EPA 

We would greatly appreciate direct submission of comments by sod farmers to EPA on refining the use patterns and rates for sod farms. The public comment docket is located at Oxadiazon Public Comment Docket or at the “Comment Here” link below. Once you have entered into the portal, click the blue box in the top left corner titled “Comment”

All comments must include Docket# EPA-HQ-OPP-2014-0782.

Please reach out to Dr. Casey Reynolds at CReynolds@TurfgrassSod.org or 847-737-1846 for more information or for assistance with providing public comment.

About the Author

Casey Reynolds, PhD
Dr. Casey Reynolds is the Executive Director at Turfgrass Producers International

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